Steve Cannon

Arts for Art Tribute to Steve Cannon - September 6, 6:30pm

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Get your tickets for Arts for Art’s Tribute to Steve Cannon

September 6, 6:30pm

The Clemente, 107 Suffolk St, NYC 10002

Arts for Art partners will be partnering with A Gathering of the Tribes to present a special evening of tribute performances to Steve Cannon (1935-2019). A writer, teacher, mentor, supporter of artists, and jazz lover, Cannon was a Lower East Side icon and fellow organizer who created a community of poets, writers, and artists in his home. Steve Cannon was a longtime supporter of AFA, both performing at and helping curate poetry for the Vision Festival starting with its inception in 1996.

6:30pm Opening by Melanie Goodreaux and Patricia Nicholson

6:45pm Poetry

Yuko Otomo // Lydia Cortes // Edwin Torres // Steve Dalachinsky

7:30pm William Parker's What It Is

William Parker - bass, composition / Patricia Nicholson Parker - dance, text

James Brandon Lewis - tenor sax / Devin Brahja Waldman - alto sax / Melanie Dyer - viola Val

Jeanty - electronics, percussion

8:30pm Poetry

Anne Waldman // Julie Ezelle Patton // Tracie Morris w/ Elliott Sharp and Graham Haynes

9:00pm Sun Ra Arkestra

Steve Cannon, Whose Townhouse Was an East Village Salon, Dies at 84

Steve Cannon at his townhouse in the East Village in 2014 as he was preparing to move out. He had overseen a salon there, opening his doors and welcoming artists, musicians, poets and others to join a conversation that meandered for decades. Credit: Adam Golfer | NYTimes.com

Steve Cannon at his townhouse in the East Village in 2014 as he was preparing to move out. He had overseen a salon there, opening his doors and welcoming artists, musicians, poets and others to join a conversation that meandered for decades.
Credit: Adam Golfer | NYTimes.com

By Colin Moynihan

For years, Steve Cannon, a writer and publisher, maintained an open-door policy at his three-story Federal-style townhouse in the East Village of Manhattan, creating a salon that welcomed a revolving cast of visitors to join a continuing conversation.

Painters, poets, musicians and composers showed up. So did a grab bag of others who wandered in, some by pure chance. And presiding over it all was Mr. Cannon, who had lost his eyesight to glaucoma in 1989.

Mr. Cannon died on July 7 at 84. A half sister, Evelyn Omega Cannon, said the cause was believed to be septic shock following hip surgery at a Veterans Affairs hospital in Manhattan.

Mr. Cannon bought the townhouse, on East Third Street between Avenues C and D, in 1970. In the early 1990s he started a literary magazine there, A Gathering of the Tribes, along with an art gallery. Writers like Paul Beatty and Miguel Algarin contributed to the magazine.

The publication and gallery reflected the grit and creativity of the neighborhood in the 1990s, when the East Village, not yet gentrified, was still a bastion of the avant-garde.

Something always seemed to be happening at Mr. Cannon’s place. Annual festivals honoring the great jazz saxophonist Charlie Parker were planned there. Ishmael Reed, one of Mr. Cannon’s longtime friends, read his work at the gallery. Members of the experimental Sun Ra Arkestra performed in the backyard.

The artist David Hammons, another friend, once painted a wall inside the gallery as part of an installation. Among the regular visitors was the cornetist and composer Butch Morris, an East Village neighbor who had created a form of large-ensemble music built on collective improvisation.

Read the full article here.

" The last New York bohemian " - El País, the main newspaper in Spain.

Steve Cannon, in the living room of his last home in New York, in December.  ACAUTHEN9

Steve Cannon, in the living room of his last home in New York, in December. ACAUTHEN9

By Mireia Sentis

With the death of the popular publisher, gallery owner and writer Steve Cannon, a way of life that seduced the less conventional artists of the Big Apple disappears

If the word "oxymoron" were a person, who would it be? How easy is the response to this children's game for those who knew the epicenter of the most productive clutter in downtown New York: "Steve Cannon!". This blind of panoramic vision directed To Gathering of the Tribes, organization founded in 1991, that included an art gallery, a publishing house for novice authors, a magazine and a seat - his own apartment - that fulfilled the function of the performance hall (concerts, performances , poetic recitals, book presentations), university classroom and refuge for anyone who wanted to converse, at any time of the day or night, with strangers who were converted from that moment and for always part of the Tribes family.

Professor Cannon, a true Hamelin, orchestrated all these activities from a dilapidated sofa that did not leave or sleep (the bedroom was a temporary shelter for artists who came looking for a place in the sun in the Big Apple), something he did when he felt like it , whatever happened at that moment in his room. On that island where there were no rules of any kind, they were going to smoke who could not do it in another covered place, to drink those who did it at the wrong time, or to face constructive as well as destructive criticism who needed to show or comment on an incipient creation in any discipline. Also, those who wanted to find out where the intellectual or artistic currents of the city would flow next. In that intergenerational, interethnic and international space to which books arrived, magazines and invitations at a dizzying pace, access to extensive information. In 2014, Cannon moved to a smaller place, in the same neighborhood, the East Village, where he continued with the magazine - already in digital format -, the publishing house and its activitygriot or transmitter of stories and knowledge for all.

Steve Cannon, who died on July 7 after stumbling on his stationary bike - "I was run over," he joked from the hospital - was born in New Orleans in 1935 . After living a couple of years in London among the group of writers known as Angry Young Men ( comprised of John Osborne, Harold Pinter, Kingsley Amis, Alan Sillitoe ..., he settled in New York in 1962. In 1969 he published a novel that would reach the category of worship: Groove, Bang and Jive Around (Enjoy, fuck and have fun out there), built in the style that his friend Ishmael Reed would announce as neohoodoo and published by Girodias, son of the editor of Henry Miller. The vicissitudes of a girl who runs away from home and lives the most extreme adventures are narrated with an accelerated rhythm, full of Southern lingo and poetic cadences. What should have been his second novel disappeared in a fire, and since then he opted for theater and poetry. At the present time he was working on a memoir that dictated to a tape recorder and he thought it was entitled Never Too Old To Blush (Never too old to blush).

Read the full article here.

OUR LITTLE NEW BORN BABY

OUR LITTLE NEW BORN BABY

(The Joke)

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by Naomi Brown


I have a little brother,

He’s a new born baby boy

Such a happy, healthy baby

To the Cannons, he’s a joy!


As a child, he wasn’t lonely....

Seven sisters, five brothers, too...

They all made up the Cannon Clan,

Thirteen kids were in this crew.


They grew and scattered all around,

Our baby’s in New York City.

He established quite a following,

That’s why I write this ditty.


Steve is always on the go...

He rarely is at home,

Everyone wants a part of him,

He’s almost never all alone.


We wonder where he is sometimes,

Maybe Phoebe or Tracie might know.

Engaged in a lively discussion,

Can’t tell where he might go.


Checking on my email,

I was quite dismayed to see

That Steve fell down and broke his hip,

This is a definite concern to me.


Steve’s now in rehab, doing fine

Although his hip was broke.

He laughed during our conversation,

Taking it as his latest joke!


Do you know my baby brother?

Steve Cannon is his name.

But Steve’s not a tiny baby;

He’s now a full grown man.


He thinks that he’s a New Yorker

But New Orleans has a bigger claim.

His ancestry and genealogy

Both contributed to his fame.


Steve’s a writer and a poet,

A novelist and teacher, too,

Founder and publisher of a magazine,

And still he is not through.


He still puts pen to paper

But his pen’s in another’s hand.

Steve has been blind for decades.

This has never stopped this man.


He needs no tea or sympathy

His life is really full.

Steve Cannon is to be admired,

You can bet that there’s no bull.


“Blind Professor of the East Side”.

That’s how he is fondly known.

When I think of his accomplishments,

My mind is completely blown!


You think, “ That,s just Steve’s sister.

Who’s so generous with praise”.

But folks at “A Gathering of the Tribes”,

All agree in a thousand ways!



Twenty Class Tobacco Suits 1998 Interview with Anthony Murrell by John Farris & Steve Cannon

The interview with Anthony Murrell by John Farris & Steve Cannon is organized from left to right and it continues on the next row.

Part 3 & 4 of the interview (shown below).

Part 5 & 6 of the interview (shown below).

Personal Problems presented by Ishmael Reed and Steve Cannon

Produced by non other than the famous Ishmael Reed and the un famous Steve Cannon. The many award winning writer Ishmael Reed and the no award winning writer Steve Cannon. The full movie is now available on kanopy.com. Click here to see the full movie.

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The recent release of Bill Gunn's Personal Problems (Kino Lorber) marks a major intervention in correcting this limited history. Not much has been written about it. Nicholas Forster, a PhD student at Yale University, is writing the first biography of Bill Gunn. The few writings about Personal Problems understandably position it in an auteurist framework of Gunn's oeuvre since he has been neglected by film history. Yet the Blu-ray release of Personal Problems can also be seen as a major intervention in recovering "lost" videotapes representing an important black collective creative contribution of US grassroots videomaking.

As film and media historians like David James, Chon Noreiga, Devorah Heitner, and Cynthia A. Young have chronicled ethnic cinemas and media proliferated within the United States throughout the '60s and '70s in the wake of anti-colonial global resistance, Third Cinema endeavors, the civil rights movement, and student upheaval. The recently established Ethno-Communications Program at UCLA provides fertile terrain for the development of many skilled black filmmakers like Charles Burnett, Billy Woodberry, Julie Dash, and Haile Gerima. But even more broadly, the Black Arts Movement, the Chicano Arts Movement, the American Indian Movement, among many others, inject youth with a desire to produce new artistic forms that not only better reflected their communities, but also were more intertwined with and produced by those communities.

So when Ishmael Reed, Steve Cannon, and Joe Johnson formed a small publishing house named Reed, Cannon, and Johnson Communications Co. to publish and distribute the works by black and other underrepresented authors, they were only one among a sea of independent ventures made by those coming from communities of color to own the creative means of production that allowed for a more diverse art and literature to spread beyond the confines that traditional cultural gatekeepers allowed. As time progressed, Reed suggested creating a black meta soap opera radio play since Steven Cannon hosted a show on WBAI in New York City and Reed hosted a show on KQED in California, where it could be broadcast. According to Cannon on a Blu-ray extra, "We were dissatisfied with the kind of stuff that was coming out of Hollywood, that Blaxploitation, Super Fly and that kind of bullshit. We wanted to do something ... more authentic and more realistic in terms of middle-class black people."

Read more about the article.

Hieroglyphics 3rd Eye Vision Review

Hieroglyphics 3rd Eye Vision Review

Hieroglyphics is an Oakland based hip-hop collective that has always thrive to dismantle music by tackling the social consciousness through their scrupulous wordplay. With their extensive knowledge of hip-hop, Hieroglyphics focused more on the lyrical flow rather than the gangster life and always positioned themselves as the alternative to the mainstream and this is best exemplified with their first studio album, 3rd Eye Vision.